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ADVOCATE

ADVOCATE

WEA Retired members stay involved in key public education issues and support today's active members in moving our schools forward.

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EXPERIENCE

EXPERIENCE

WEA Retired and pre-retired members share decades of experience in our schools to help improve public education in Washington.

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GUIDE

GUIDE

WEA Retired brings together the power of thousands of members to focus on life-long career issues.

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Retirement Issues / WEA-Retired


Joining WEA-Retired makes sense ... even if I'm not retired yet!

WEA-Retired membership allows you to access WEA and NEA member benefits the rest of your life. Read More... or join the team now! Enroll online quickly, easily and securely with your credit card. Or, if you want to pay by check, print this form and mail it with your payment.

Pre-Retirement seminars
Are you willing to bet you're ready for retirement? Better not! Attend a pre-retirement seminar in your area. Learn more...

WEA health insurance options As a school district or educational service district employee, you may be eligible for PEBB retiree health insurance. Please review these materials to familiarize yourself with procedures to enroll now or protect this benefit for your future enollment. Read more ...

WEA-Retired Scholarships
WEA-Retired offers up to five $1,000 nonrenewable scholarships for the purpose of assisting WEA members to enhance skills in specific education areas and/or attain a teaching certificate. Certificated, classified (ESP) or student WEA members are eligible to apply. Applications for the 2014 scholarships are now being accepted. Complete an Application Form, and submit a Letter of Application using the criteria in the addendum for Certificated members, Classified (ESP) members, or Student WEA members.

The deadline to apply has passed for the 2014 scholarships.

WEA-Retired Awards Nomination Form
WEA-Retired honors members and others for contributions to the organization. Categories include Member of the Year, Pre-Retired Member of the Year, and Media Award. Click here for the Nomination Forms.

Social Security is Solid
Nine digits. Three then two then four. The vast majority of us have those nine digits memorized. They are a part of who we are. We can be issued a social security card immediately after being born and many parents do apply for a social security card for their infants. It makes us official. We are told to guard our number carefully and we use it for all kinds of official documents. A social security card validates our existence as well as our sense of “belonging” in this country.

It seems current rhetoric is trying to position Social Security as a “handout” or as a program that is bankrupting our national government. It is important to remind ourselves the origin of the program as well as the fact that we, as workers, invest in social security. We are paying in to the program so that, later, we can collect on what we saved up.

Workers pay into Social Security and Medicare because of a 1935 law that mandates their contribution and that employers (like school districts) must also pay into the pool through the Federal Insurance Contributions Act match. Efforts to cut this program, which has been a cornerstone program for more than 75 years, must be examined. Pay attention to the people who are trying to abolish the program and learn more about it.

The term social security was originally used in our country by Abraham Epstein in connection with his group, the American Association for Social Security. When the Social Security Act first passed, it was actually named the Economic Security Act but it was changed during Congressional consideration of the bill. The cards were originally issued through U.S. post offices. Take a look at the brochure written in 1953.

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